Tag Archives: epsom salt

Squash Issues – Yellowing Leaves on Some Plants

In one of my raised beds, I have some squash plants – both summer yellow and zucchini – that are turning yellow.   In the neighboring bed some of the late planted squash appears to be stunted.  This is affecting the older leaves first.  The edges turn yellow and the leaf surface is splotched with yellow areas.  (This year I am growing some of my summer squash – both yellow and zucchini – in tomato cages to see if I can get a better control over the plants that would otherwise sprawl all over.)

The little squash plant to the front left of this caged plant appears to be stunted.  The plant to the back, right of the center caged plant is OK.  The problem plants are intermixed with plants that are just fine and looking good.  This is a pointer to mosaic virus as opposed to a nutrient deficiency.  I have a hard time thinking that a nutrient deficiency would only affect intermittent plants when the soil was turned over and mixed before planting.
summer squash leaves are yellowing

And a closeup:  The younger leaves are OK so far.
summer squash leaves are yellowing

After spending hours searching for an answer, the 2 most promising answers are either a nutrient deficiency or a mosaic virus.

Below is a broader view.  Some of the plants are affected while others aren’t.  To add more confusion, I only made note of the varieties that I originally planted, not the subsequent 3 re-seedings that I had to do because of poor germination.  (I don’t know why the seeds did not germinate well, the original planting was 2 year old professional seed that has been stored in the refrigerator.)  The 2 original varieties were Superpik yellow and Obsidian zucchini, both on the Cucumber Mosaic Virus Resistant list at Cornell’s Squash resistance lists.

What is affecting my squash does not look exactly like any mosaic virus images I found, neither does it look exactly like Zinc deficiency, although it does look a wee bit more like the zinc deficient images.  It could also be magnesium or manganese deficiency.

So what to do?  I am not ready to pull the plants because I don’t know for sure if it is a mosaic virus.  I am going to water the squash with a handful of Epsom salt in the water.  Maybe I can crush a few zinc vitamin pills and add it to the magnesium sulfate mix.
summer squash leaves are yellowing

Oh what to do?  I have squished a few squash bugs and scraped numerous batches of eggs off of the leaves.  My research has revealed that aphids and cucumber beetles are the culprits that transmit mosaic viruses, not squash bugs, although squash bugs are blamed for transmission of some plant diseases.  No clear answer.

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Yellowing Squash Leaves – Chlorosis?

I have about 2 summer squash plants in one bed that have leaves that are yellowing and decaying.  This is one summer squash, planted among other squash.  Only this one plant has this issue.  The older leaves turned yellow between the veins, then dried to whitish.  The edges curl up and the leaf finally dries up.  The new inner leaves are fine for a while.  I decided to cut these bad leaves off, leaving the hollow stems, just in case it is a virus.  You can see the plant to the right, it is just fine.
yellowing squash leaves

This other plant, thru the raised cattle panel, about 2 feet further along the bed, also has some of these leaves.  I decided to cut them off also.
yellowing squash leaves

I have done a search as to what could be causing this problem.  The most likely culprit seems to maybe be chlorosis.  Chlorosis is a nutrient deficiency although I don’t know what nutrient it could be.  I found this: “Iron, sulfur and manganese deficiencies cause yellowing in the younger leaves first, while nitrogen, magnesium and molybdenum deficiencies first afflict the older leaves”.  I have what I need to rectify nitrogen and Mg deficiency:  blood meal and epsom salt.  It won’t hurt to spread a little bit of both around.  However, I still don’t understand how just 2 of a dozen plants have this problem.  I also have some organic fertilizer with lots of trace elements in it.  I think I will spread a bit of these 3 substances around these plants tomorrow.

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Beautiful Peppers

Originally published Summer 2011

I am always looking for new and interesting peppers to grow.  This year I grew 2 new varieties of peppers:  Santa Fe Grande, a supposedly hot pepper, although I didn’t find it so hot when cutting it up for stir-fry.  Here is a pic of this gorgeous pepper: (Edit:  I think this beauty is actually a Cubanelle pepper.  I’m having a bit of trouble this year with a couple of the 5 new pepper varieties that I grew this year – don’t know if the seller mixed seeds – not all plants are what I expected).

Santa Fe Grande pepper

And Chocolate peppers, basically a brown bell pepper. I am really pleased with them – it isn’t easy to grow large bell peppers here. They either don’t reach full size, or they get some sort of issue that produces dead, thin, black sections on the walls.

3 Chocolate Bell peppers

I am saving seeds from both of these varieties and plan on growing both of them next year.

It is interesting that pepper plants that produce larger peppers have larger leaves and peppers that grow smaller peppers, such as cayenne have smaller leaves.  If you are looking at a pepper plant with just buds, you can get an idea whether the peppers will mature to large or small peppers by looking at the size of most of the plant’s leaves. When planting my pepper seedlings in the spring, I always put a tablespoon of epsom salt in the bottom of the hole because a little bit of magnesium and sulfur are good for peppers. I also like to add a tablespoon of epsom salt to a gallon jug of water and water the peppers during the mid season.

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