Category Archives: Heirloom Plants

Johnny Jump Ups from Monticello

I have Johnny Jump Ups, originally from Monticello's collection of 'Tri-Color" variety.  In the picture below, I have circled one flower that is closest to the original coloring - dark purple top petals, white enter petals and yellow bottom petal.  I have had these things seeding themselves all over my yard and gardens for about 5 years.  I got them from my mom's place where she had them growing for years after bringing them home from a trip to Virginia and Thomas Jefferson's Monticello.  This Read more [...]

Kale and the Cross Striped Cabbage Worm

Kale dries so nice and dark green.  This is a tray of end of season kale that I have been drying.  I then crumble it and put it in glass jars to add into whatever I can when I cook.  Just a pinch equals a large fresh leaf.  I dry them at a low temperature for a few hours so I am assuming that most of the nutrients are still in there. As previously posted, worms devastated my fall garden.  Very few kale plants survived the worms after numerous re-plantings.  This kale plant grew to almost Read more [...]

My Cotton Is Trying To Produce A 2nd Harvest

I bought some green heirloom cotton seeds from Southern Exposure seeds.  I have been growing a half dozen or so plants for a few years, just collecting the cotton for the time being. I planted the plants - this year from last year's seeds - in the spring and the cotton was ready to harvest by late summer.  I decided to just leave the plants in the ground after harvest.  I then noticed that the plants put on new leaves and then new buds.  I let them grow.  By late fall and cold weather, the Read more [...]

This Season’s Tomato & Pepper Seedlings

The Tomato and Pepper seedlings are coming along very well. I started the tomatoes and peppers in small seed starting plug trays - with between 72 and 128 cells in each flat. This works very well. I put at least 2 seeds in each hole, sometimes more if I think the pepper seeds won't germinate well. I had almost full pepper germination! I have a hard time just pinching off the extra seedling, so I end up pulling the plug out, separating the roots and replanting them in recycled plastic plant holders. Read more [...]

Some Cabbage Heads, Some Cabbage Bolts

It must be the crazy winters down south.  The temperature variations must throw the cabbage plants off.  This past winter started out with an early frozen blast, then was mild for most of the winter and then ended in another frozen blast. I get my thrills starting my cabbages and broccoli from seed.  Due to lack of garden space, I planted these in the tomato bed after the toms died out for the summer.  Both of these are early cabbages.  I would like to grow late cabbage, but it takes an additional Read more [...]

Buckeyes!

Today, when walking to the mail box, I saw them - six of them - clustered together under what I thought was a Firecracker plant next to the driveway. Doing a bit of research I found that the Firecracker plant and the buckeye are the SAME plant. These are large seeds - a bit larger than a whole walnut.  The buckeye at the top looks like it has already started t germinate.  In the top right is a part of the outer shell that holds 2 or 3 of these buckeyes together in their pod.  They reportedly Read more [...]

Late Season Bean Planting

After trying to get over the failure of my spring garden, probably due to Dow Agriscience's poison aminopyralid, I have decided to replant some quick growers for the second half of our growing season here in Texas.  This bed is scheduled to have broccoli, cabbage and greens this fall.  However, since these crops won't be planted for at least 6 to 8 weeks, I am going to try to get a quick crop of beans. So far, the beans look OK.  I think that maybe most of the poison aminopyralid may have degraded Read more [...]

A Few Peppers From A Lousy Harvest Complements of Dow Agriscience

Thanks to Dow's wonderful poison called aminopyralid, all of my pepper plants were deformed and stunted and most of them died.  A very few recovered enough to produce a few little peppers.  Here are some of that very few: (That lime isn't part of the harvest - it's part of the home made salsa!!)  By this time in the season, I should have 5 gallon pails full of peppers.  Ha, not this year.  Thanks Dow!  By the way, their rep never got back with me.  Gave me a song and dance like dow really Read more [...]

Three Types Of Cucumbers This Season

I have grown 3 types of cucumbers this spring.  The 3 shorties on the left are Little Muncher/Ferry Morse from a store rack.  The next 2 are Tasty Green hybrid from Twilley Seeds.  The 2 on the right are Heirloom Japanese Long Soyu. I don't like Marketmore type cukes - I prefer English type cukes.  Thus these 3 varieties do not have that bitter jelly like filling around the seeds like the standard Marketmore cukes do. Read more [...]

Second Year Gogi Berry Lookin’ Good

Last year, this Gogi berry was so small it would have gotten lost in the big out of doors. These little purple flowers are on the original branches - this is their 2nd year.  Maybe they will mature to berries.  On the left side of the pic are a number of new shoots that popped up from the soil this year.  I potted it up to a bigger pot this spring.  I will be trying to find a special place for it around the garden area and might be ready to put it in the ground next spring. The plant is less Read more [...]